Chipotle Chicken and Vidalia Cabbage

Are you looking for a quick and easy weeknight dinner while getting back into the swing of the new school year?  This recipe is ready in 30 minutes and takes only five minutes to prep!

Ingredients:

  • 1 package boneless, skinless chicken thighs
  • Mrs. Dash southwest chipotle seasoning
  • 1 small head red cabbage
  • 1 medium vidalia onion
  • extra virgin olive oil
  • salt & pepper

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Directions:

Chicken

  • Preheat the oven to 350 degrees
  • Place thighs in a baking dish and season with southwest chipotle seasoning (to taste)
  • Add 1/3 cup water to the pan, cover with foil and bake for 30 minutes

Vidalia Cabbage

  • Roughly chop the cabbage and onion and add to a large frying pan.
  • Drizzle with extra virgin olive oil, season with salt & pepper (to taste) and saute until tender.

Health Benefits of Cabbage

One cup of chopped red cabbage has 28 calories, .1 gram of fat and 1 gram of protein. You’ll get 2 grams of dietary fiber, which is 5 percent of the recommended daily intake for men and 8 percent for women. Insoluble fiber from red cabbage prevents constipation, lowers the risk of developing diverticular disease and helps relieve the symptoms of some gastrointestinal conditions, such as irritable bowel syndrome.

Vitamin C:  1 cup of chopped red cabbage has 56 percent of the recommended daily intake of this important vitamin.

Eye Health:  One cup of red cabbage contains 33 percent of the recommended daily intake of vitamin A, and may help prevent age-related macular degeneration.

Vitamin K:  According to research published in the April 2012 issue of “Food and Nutrition Research” you’ll gain 28 percent of the recommended daily intake of vitamin K from 1 cup of chopped red cabbage.

Cancer Prevention:  Red cabbage belongs to the cruciferous, or Brassica, family that includes broccoli, turnips and Brussels sprouts. In April 2012, Vanderbilt University Medical Center released research results showing that breast cancer survivors who ate more cruciferous vegetables reduced their risk of dying by 62 percent.

 

 

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